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Moose Browse – Late Winter in Maine’s Woods

Moose Browse – Late Winter in Maine’s Woods

Moose Browse

It’s still very much winter here in northeastern Maine. Snow is measured in feet in parts of our woodlot. Branches I don’t notice when the ground is bare have to be ducked under now. The bobcat is still hunting snowshoe hare in sight of the house and now, there’s a fisher passing through. I find their tracks in the snow. And speaking of tracks in the snow, last weekend I found tracks that made us stop the truck and back up. I’ll share them tomorrow. Back to moose browse. We were looking at a logging job in an area there are a lot of moose. A pile of cedar logs that hadn’t been delimbed yet served as moose browse.


moose browse, cedar, what do moose eat, winter
moose browse, twigs, cedar

Moose Track in Snow

moose track in snow, moose browseMoose aren’t having a hard time with the snow. Their legs are long enough to deal with a foot or two with ease. They leave tracks that are so large their hard to mistake even if you see them from a distance. They’re large, deep and far apart. In a winter with deep snow they’re easier to see on plowed roads and snowmobile trails. If you have a vehicle that will take you safely down woods roads to timber harvests after the harvest is complete, you might find them browsing cedar tops left behind.

Other than old age, moose are it’s most likely to die because of winter ticks, also known as moose ticks. We haven’t seen this yet this winter but we know it’s happening. Watch for bare spots in their coat, blood and hair on the snow where they’ve bedded down, and emaciated moose, especially calves. It’s a sad thing to see and awful way to die.

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Campfire S’mores – Adults love them, too!

Campfire S’mores – Adults love them, too!

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned in Campfire S’mores in a Cone with Reynolds Wrap for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog, or I will be compensated for writing this blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.” Photos courtesy of Reynolds Kitchen.

Campfire S’mores in a Cone with Reynolds Wrap

I needed to make something different when I planned my Campfire Cooking for Kids workshop in Grand Lake Stream last summer. Who doesn’t love S’mores, right? I learned to make regular S’mores when I was in Girl Scouts. S’mores are great and I knew the kids would like them but I needed a twist. Aha! Campfire S’mores in waffle cones. They were a huge hit, and thanks to Reynolds Wrap, they were easy to make, and clean up was quick.

Campfire S’mores are no more complicated than their graham cracker cousins. We toreTear off a section of Reynolds Wrap Aluminum Foil. Do that first otherwise you’ll be tearing with one hand while holding a cone in the other. Nobody needs that stress.

Campfire S’mores Instructions

Fill the bottom of your cones with a one-inch layer of mini marshmallows, then a layer of chocolate chips, more marshmallows, and then more chocolate chips because you can’t have too much chocolate, and topped it off with marshmallows. Wrap the cone in the Reynolds Wrap Aluminum Foil. Place the cones on a rack above the coals (no flames, just coals). After two minutes, use tongs to turn the cone one-half turn, and then let the cone sit over the heat another minute or two depending on how hot the coals are. Remove from heat and allow to cool for a minute. Use pot holders to unwrap the foil.

Campfire S'mores in a Waffle Cone! Best ever S'more. You know you want one!Click To Tweet

Campfire S'mores, waffle cones, s'moas
Campfire S'mores, camping, campfire, s'mores, s'moas
Campfire S'mores, recipe, waffle cone, campfire cookingThe marshmallows and chocolate chips will be all or partially melted. It’s easier to eat a Campfire S’more than a “normal” one because the cone keeps the gooey, melted deliciousness contained. For variety, change up the chocolate chips for butterscotch chips, Heath Bar crumbles and other candies that will melt.

As a side note: I do only use Reynolds Wrap aluminum foil. Reynolds Wrap holds up better because it’s stronger. If I’m stuck with a lesser quality foil I need to use two or three sheets to equal one sheet of Reynolds. Check out Reynolds Kitchen for recipes and tips.

Ice Fishing – Extensive Ice Fishing Guide

Ice Fishing – Extensive Ice Fishing Guide

Ice Fishing

This ice fishing guide has been pinned from my old blog a lot lately so I thought I’d move it over here. We’re already planning ice fishing weekends, which lakes and ponds we can drive to on the snowmobiles from the house, and what fish we want to catch this winter. I haven’t caught salmon and trout so they’re close to the top of my list. Cusk is number one because it’s my favorite for fish chowder and fish fries. The flesh is white and firm and holds up well recipe I’ve used.

We’ve been ice fishish at several of the local lakes and ponds and look forward to one or two different bodies this winter. I’m ready so here’s to hoping for safe ice by the end of January. Watch for recipes this winter!

ice fishing, guide, how to ice fish

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