Short-tailed Weasel – Living With Wildlife

Short-tailed Weasel – Living With Wildlife

Wildlife stories galore. I have three updates from the homestead and photos away from the homestead and I don’t know where to start. I’ll start here on the homestead. hmm…how about cute? Let’s go with cute first.

Remember Slinky? Another ermine, called a stoat as well as short-tailed weasel when dressed in their summer coats, spent part of the winter slipping into the sun porch to hunt mice. I’ve been feeding her, of course. Two weeks ago she struggled to fit through the hole she’s been using all winter. “She’s looking a little chubby,” I told Steve. Last year’s weasel moved her still-naked babies into the wood shed on June 29. It seemed too early to be that far into a pregnancy.

Today, April 29, Slinky ’18 moved at least two furred kits from the barn into the wood shed. I’m sure there were more as the dogs were going nuts earlier. I assumed they were after a red squirrel and let them be. When I realized my mistake I closed them inside. And I waited.

6 thoughts on “Short-tailed Weasel – Living With Wildlife

    1. They do. They’ll bite the bird’s neck and drink the blood. They don’t bother my chickens so they’re okay here. If they cross that line I will have to deal with them. We have so many meadow voles that I doubt the weasels could go hungry. One spring day last year I watched the then resident weasel make a dozen trips into the woods and back with a vole in just over an hour.

  1. Oooohh, how are they at getting voles? Also, are they big enough to be a bother to the chickens? (Mink are awful.) You have me intrigued.

  2. Super cute to look at, but my dogs would never tolerate them… Saint considers it her mission in life to kill anything that I have not “blessed” by introducing her to and warning her that thing is ‘paws off’.

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